Affiliated Faculty

INSCT faculty have experience in national security and counterterrorism law and policy, cybersecurity law and policy, homeland security, disaster preparedness and response, military planning and operations, arms control and counter-proliferation, diplomacy and international relations, terrorist methods and psychology, mass communication, critical infrastructure and systems assurance, history, law, and economics.

William C. Banks

WILLIAM C. BANKS

Biography

Founding Director of the Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism (INSCT), Professor William C. Banks is an internationally recognized authority in national security, counterterrorism, international humanitarian, and constitutional law. By co-authoring the textbooks National Security Law (Aspen, 2012) and Counterterrorism Law (Aspen, 2011), he has helped set the parameters for these fields of study, and he is the author and/or editor of numerous other books, including Counterinsurgency Law: New Directions in Asymmetric Warfare (Oxford UP, 2012) and New Battlefields/Old Laws: Critical Debates on Asymmetric Warfare (Columbia UP, 2011)

The subjects of his many book chapters and articles range from the military use of unmanned aerial vehicles, to terrorism in South America, to the role of the military in domestic affairs. Recent writing includes “Regulating Cyber Conflict;” “Regulating Drones: Military Law and CIA Practice and the Shifting Challenges of New Technologies;” “Exceptional Courts in Counterterrorism: Lessons from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA);” and “Programmatic Surveillance and FISA: Of Needles in Haystacks.”

In addition to teaching national security law and counterterrorism law at SU, he lectures around the globe on various national security and constitutional law-related topics and on comparative legal systems. His current research interests include cybersecurity/cyberespionage, the military use of drones, domestic and international terrorism, emergency and war powers, and emergency preparedness and response.

In 2015, Banks was named Interim Dean of Syracuse University College of Law, where he has been a member of the faculty for more than 35 years.

A graduate of the University of Nebraska (B.A. 1971) and the University of Denver (J.D. 1974; M.S. 1982), Banks joined the faculty of the SU College of Law in 1978. In 1998, he was appointed a Professor of Public Administration in SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, and he was named a Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor for Teaching Excellence in the same year. He founded INSCT in 2003, and he became the first College of Law Board of Advisors Distinguished Professor at Syracuse University in 2008.

Among his public service appointments, Banks has served as a Special Counsel to the US Senate Judiciary Committee (for the confirmation hearings of Supreme Court nominee Stephen G. Breyer); on the ABA Standing Committee on Law and National Security; as a member of the InfraGard National Members Alliance Board of Advisors; on the Advisory Council for the Perpetual Peace Project; on the Executive Board of the International Counter-Terrorism Academic Community (ICTAC); and as a Distinguished Fellow of the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University. Banks also is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy.

Faculty Webpage
Mehrzad_Boroujerdi_2

MEHRZAD BOROUJERDI

Biography

Mehrzad Boroujerdi is Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department and O’Hanley Faculty Scholar at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He is also the Provost Faculty Fellow for Internationalization at Syracuse University and immeditate past President of the International Society for Iranian Studies.

He is the author of Iranian Intellectuals and the West: The Tormented Triumph of Nativism (1996), and I Carved, Worshiped and Shattered: Essays on Iranian Politics and Identity [in Persian] (2010). In addition to more than thirty journal articles and book chapters in English and Persian he is also the editor of Mirror for the Muslim Prince: Islam and Theory of Statecraft (2013). He is interviewed quite frequently by AP, BBC, LA Times, NPR, The New York Times, Reuters, VOA, and Washington Post.

Dr. Boroujerdi is a Nonresident Scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C., a member of the Board of Directors of the Near East Foundation, and a principal investigator of the Iran Data Portal. He served as the Founding Director of the Middle Eastern Studies Program at Syracuse University from 2003 to 2014. Since 1996 he has also served as the editor of the Modern Intellectual and Political History of the Middle East book series published by Syracuse University Press.

Dr. Boroujerdi has been the recipient of grants and fellowships from Harvard University, Henry R. Luce Foundation, Carnegie Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, Social Science Research Council, the Institute of International Education, the U.S. Department of Education, and the United States Institute of Peace. Other awards include the Foundation for Iranian Studies Best Doctoral Dissertation (1990), and the Maxwell School’s Daniel Patrick Moynihan Award for outstanding teaching, research, and service (1998).

Faculty Webpage
Shiu-Kai Chin

SHIU-KAI CHIN

Biography

Shiu-Kai Chin is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at SU. He is Co-Director (with Scott Bernard) of the Center for Information and Systems Assurance and Trust (CISAT). Chin’s research applies mathematical logic to the engineering of trustworthy systems and investigates access control and policy-based design and verification. He supports the research program of the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Cyber Operations Branch in the Information Grid Division in trustworthy systems and hardware-based computer security, and he and his students have created engineering design and verification procedures using higher-order logic to make trustworthy hardware and software.

Chin is a member of the National Institute of Justice’s Electronic Crime Technical Working Group. With JP Morgan Chase, he applies his research to reasoning about credentials and entitlements in large-value commercial transactions. He is co-author, with Dr. Susan Older, of the textbook Access Control, Security, and Trust: A Logical Approach (CRC Press, 2011).

Chin also is one of the instructors in the Air Force Research Laboratory’s Information Assurance Internship Program, the successor to the Advanced Course in Engineering (ACE) Cyber Security Boot Camp. He is one of two instructors who taught the full eight-year span of ACE, which, from 2003 to 2010, was a 10-week summer program for Air Force ROTC cadets whose mission was to develop the next generation of cyber leaders through education, hands-on training, officer development—and weekly eight-mile runs! ACE was based upon the highly successful three-and-a-half-year General Electric Advanced Course in Engineering, of which Professor Chin is a graduate.

Faculty Webpage

DAVID M. CRANE

In 2018, David Crane announced his retirement from the Syracuse University College of Law faculty.
Biography

David M. Crane is a Professor of Practice at the SU College of Law.  Before entering academia, Crane served in the US government for more than 30 years, as the Director of the Office of Intelligence Review, Department of Defense Inspector General; Assistant General Counsel for the Defense Intelligence Agency; and as Waldemar A. Solf Professor of International Law at the Judge Advocate General’s School, US Army. From 2002 to 2005 Crane served as the Chief Prosecutor of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, an international war crimes tribunal.

Crane is the author of numerous scholarly articles on international criminal law and national security, and he lectures and speaks throughout the world on the rule of law. He holds a J.D. from SU and a Doctor of Law degree from Case Western Reserve University.

Faculty Webpage
Renee de Nevers

RENÉE DE NEVERS

Biography

Renée de Nevers is an Associate Professor of Public Administration. Previously, she taught at the University of Oklahoma and was a Program Officer at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. She has been a research fellow at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, the Center for International Security and Cooperation, the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, and the International Institute for Strategic Studies. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

de Nevers’ articles and books include Combating Terrorism (CQ Press, 2007), co-authored with William C. Banks and Mitchel B. Wallerstein, and Comrades No More: The Seeds of Change in Eastern Europe (MIT Press, 2003). Her research interests include the implications for sovereignty of nonproliferation-related interdiction activities and regulation of private security firms.

Faculty Webpage

COLIN ELMAN

Biography

Colin Elman studies International Relations theory, the history of the US as a great power, and qualitative methods in political and social inquiry. He is co-founder and director of the Institute for Qualitative and Multi-Method Research, based at SU, which offers intensive methods training to graduate students and faculty from across the country and the world. Elman’s co-edited books include Progress in International Relations Theory: Appraising the Field (MIT Press, 2003), Realism and the Balancing of Power: A New Debate (Prentice Hall, 2003), and Bridges and Boundaries: Historians, Political Scientists, and the Study of International Relations (MIT Press, 2001).

Faculty Webpage
Miriam Elman

MIRIAM FENDIUS ELMAN

Biography

Miriam F. Elman is an Associate Professor of Political Science focusing on the impact of war and peace on democratic political development, democratization in the Middle East; the role of religious political parties in promoting or moderating violence; and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Elman is the editor of Paths to Peace: Is Democracy the Answer? (MIT Press, 1997) and co-editor of Bridges and Boundaries: Historians, Political Scientists, and the Study of International Relations (MIT Press, 2001) and Progress in International Relations Theory: Appraising the Field (MIT Press, 2008). Elman currently serves on the editorial board of International Security. She received her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Faculty Webpage

LAURYN GOULDIN

Biography

Lauryn Gouldin is an Associate Professor at SU College of Law, where she teaches criminal law and evidence. Before joining the faculty, she was at New York University School of Law, where she served as Assistant Director of the Center for Research in Crime and Justice. She teaches and writes in the fields of constitutional criminal procedure, focusing on investigative detention and intelligence-gathering, criminal law, and evidence.

Gouldin graduated from Princeton University with a major in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from New York University School of Law, where she was elected to the Order of the Coif and awarded the Ann Petluck Poses Memorial Prize. She also served as the executive articles editor of the Annual Survey of American Law. Following law school, she clerked for Judge Leonard B. Sand in the Southern District of New York and for Judge Chester J. Straub of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She also spent several years as a litigation associate at Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz, working on white collar and regulatory defense, internal investigations and compliance, and securities litigation.

Faculty Webpage
Tara Helfman Portrait

TARA HELFMAN

In 2017, Tara Helfman was named Senior Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights in the US Department of Justice.
Biography

Tara Helfman teaches contract law and international law at SU College of Law. She spent 2009-2010 as the Olin/Searle Fellow at the New York University School of Law, conducting research on counterproliferation, maritime law, and legal history. Her current research interests include fiduciary law, the laws of war, and Anglo-American legal history, fields in which she has published award-winning articles.

A graduate of Yale Law School, Professor Helfman spent three years as an associate at Debevoise and Plimpton LLP, where she was a member of the International Dispute Resolution and Securities and White Collar Defense practice groups. Her pro bono work includes death penalty cases, habeas petitions, and disability rights advocacy. While at Yale, Professor Helfman was awarded the Joseph Parker Prize for Legal History and the Yale Journal of International Law Young Scholar Award.

Faculty Webpage
Margaret_Herman

MARGARET HERMANN

Biography

Peg Hermann is Gerald B. and Daphna Cramer Professor of Global Affairs and Director of the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Institute of Global Affairs at SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

Hermann’s research focuses on political leadership, foreign policy decision making, the comparative study of foreign policy, and crisis management. She has worked to develop techniques for assessing the leadership styles of heads of government at a distance and has such data on more than 300 leaders. She is currently involved in exploring the effects of different types of leaders and decision processes on the management of crises that cross border and boundaries as well as lead governments to experience crises. Her leadership style measures have also been applied to the leaders of transnational NGOs and international organizations.

Hermann has been president of the International Society of Political Psychology and the International Studies Association and an editor of Political Psychology and the International Studies Review. She developed the Summer Institute in Political Psychology and was its director for nine years. Among Hermann’s books are Describing Foreign Policy Behavior; Political Psychology: Issues and Problems; and Leaders, Groups, and Coalitions: Understanding the People and Processes in Foreign Policymaking.

Faculty Webpage
 Laurie_Hobart

LAURIE HOBART

Biography

Laurie Hobart received a B.A., summa cum laude, as a College Scholar from Cornell University’s College of Arts & Sciences; a J.D. from Harvard Law School; and an M.F.A. in fiction writing from Syracuse University. In law school, she served as an editor of two law journals and practiced criminal defense with the Harvard Criminal Justice Institute. Following law school, Hobart received a Harvard Heyman Fellowship for federal government service. She has worked as an Assistant General Counsel in the Intelligence Community, an associate at King & Spalding LLP, and a law clerk to the Honorable Charles F. Lettow of the US Court of Federal Claims. At SU, she has taught in the English & Textual Studies and Writing & Rhetoric programs.

Faculty Webpage
Azra_Hromadzic

AZRA HROMADZIC

Biography

Azra Hromadzic is a cultural anthropologist with research interests in the anthropology of international policy in the context of peace-building and democratization. Her dissertation—”Empty Nation: Youth, Education, and Democratization in Postconflict Bosnia and Herzegovina”—is an ethnographic investigation of the internationally directed postconflict intervention policies in those former Yugoslavian nations and the response of local people, especially youth, to these efforts.

Hromadzic is focusing future research on two projects. The first is a comparative study of community-based organizations that attempt to bring together ex-Yugoslavs in order to reconcile an ethnically divided population. The second project investigates the emerging economies of morality in the context of postconflict democratization.

Hromadzic’s Ph.D. is from the University of Pennsylvania.

Faculty Webpage
Andrew T Kim

ANDREW KIM

Biography

Andrew Kim is an Associate Professor of Law in the SU College of Law, where he teaches Immigration Law and Torts. His primary research interest is in immigration and refugee law, with a particular focus on theories of citizenship, cultural accommodation, and judicial review of immigration agency action.

Kim received his J.D. from Harvard Law School, where he was a senior editor of the Harvard International Law Journal and awarded a Chayes Fellowship for international legal study and a Heyman Fellowship for federal government service. Upon graduation, he clerked for the Hon. John R. Gibson of the US Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. He also litigated as an Honors Program Trial Attorney with the Constitutional Torts Section of the Civil Division of the US Department of Justice. He spent two years as a law teaching fellow at Louisiana State University Law Center.

Faculty Webpage

LOUIS KRIESBERG

Biography

Lou Kriesberg is Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies and an Associate of the Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts. Kriesberg continues to consult and lecture at universities in the US and abroad and for governmental and nongovernmental organizations in the areas of conflict resolution, transforming intractable conflicts, and American security policies.

Kriesberg has authored several landmark books in the field of conflict resolution, including Constructive Conflicts: From Escalation to Resolution (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012); International Conflict Resolution: The US-USSR and Middle East Cases (Yale UP, 1992), and Social Conflicts (Prentice Hall, 1982), and he co-edited, with Bruce Dayton, Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding: Moving from Violence to Sustainable Peace (Routledge, 2009). He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago.

Faculty Webpage
Patricia Longstaff

PATRICIA H. LONGSTAFF

Biography

Patricia Longstaff is an educator and analyst specializing in the business and public policy issues affecting the communications industry in the US and internationally. She is also a Research Affiliate at Harvard University’s Program for Information Policy Research (PIRP); a member of the US State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Communications Policy; and a member of the Board of Directors of the International Telecommunications Society.

Longstaff’s current research focus is the interdisciplinary study of resilience mechanisms. She holds a J.D. and M.A. in mass communication from the University of Iowa and a M.P.A. from Harvard University.

Faculty Webpage
 lee_mcknight

LEE MCKNIGHT

Biography

Lee W. McKnight is Kauffman Professor of Entrepreneurship and Innovation and an Associate Professor in the SU School of Information Studies (iSchool). McKinght was Principal Investigator of the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Innovation Wireless Grids Innovation Testbed (WiGiT) project 2009-2014, which was recipient of the 2011 TACNY Award for Technology Project of Year. Lee is inventor of edgeware, a new class of software for creating secure ad hoc overlay cloud to edge applications, known as gridlets and wiglets.

McKnight’s research focuses on cloud to edge services and policy, virtual markets and wireless grids, the global information economy, national and international technology policy, and Internet governance. He was an Associate Professor of International Information and Communication and Director of the Edward R. Murrow Center at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University; Principal Research Associate and Lecturer at MIT; and Founder of the Internet Telephony Consortium, also at MIT.

McKnight served on the Enterprise Cloud Leadership Council of TM Forum; and as a member of IEEE P2030.4 smart grid interoperability task force. He is Founder and was a Member of the Board of Directors of Wireless Grids Corporation, 2004-2014, and he was a Founding Member of the Board of Directors of Summerhill Biomass Systems 2007-2013 …

Faculty Webpage
VADM Robert B. Murrett

VADM ROBERT B. MURRETT (RET.)

Biography

Vice Adm. Robert B. Murrett (Ret.) was the fourth Director of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, from 2006 through 2010. Before this appointment, Murrett served as the Director of Naval Intelligence from 2005 until 2006.

Following his commissioning, Murrett was assigned as an afloat intelligence officer, including Mediterranean, North Atlantic, and western Pacific deployments aboard the USS Kitty Hawk, USS America, and USS Independence. He was assigned to the Defense Intelligence College in 1980, then detailed to the Chief of Naval Operations Intelligence Plot as a watch stander and briefing officer for Navy civilian and military leaders. From 1983 to 1985, he served as Assistant Intelligence Officer for the Commander, Second Fleet.

In 1989, Murrett reported to the Commander in Chief, US Pacific Fleet, where he was assigned as Operational Intelligence Officer. From 1992 to 1995, he served as Assistant Chief of Staff-Intelligence for the Commander, Carrier Group Eight and was deployed to the European and Central Command theaters. Between 1995 and 1997, he was Assistant Chief of Staff, Intelligence for the Commander, Second Fleet and served concurrently as N2 for NATO’s Striking Fleet Atlantic.

In June 2011, Murrett joined INSCT as Deputy Director and the faculty of SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs as Professor of Practice in Public Administration and International Affairs.

Faculty Webpage
 tina_nabatchi

TINA NABATCHI

Biography

Tina Nabatchi is an Associate Professor of Public Administration and International Affairs and a Faculty Research Associate at the Program for the Advancement of Research on Conflict and Collaboration (PARCC).

Her research focuses on citizen participation, collaborative governance, conflict resolution, and challenges in public administration. Although her scholarship is varied, the unifying theme is democratic governance in public administration.

Nabatchi’s research has been published in numerous journals, such as the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, Public Administration Review, National Civic Review, and Conflict Resolution Quarterly, among others, as well is in several edited books.

Her article, “Addressing the Citizenship and Democratic Deficits: Exploring the Potential of Deliberative Democracy for Public Administration” won the 2010 Best Article Award from The American Review of Public Administration.

Nabatchi is the lead editor of Democracy in Motion: Evaluating the Practice and Impact of Deliberative Civic Engagement (Oxford University Press, 2012).

She also has recently published two books: Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy (Jossey-Bass, 2015, with Matt Leighninger) and Collaborative Governance Regimes with Kirk Emerson (Georgetown University Press, 2015).

Faculty Webpage
Sean_Okeefe

SEAN O’KEEFE

Biography

Sean O’Keefe is University Professor and Howard G. and S. Louise Phanstiel Chair in Strategic Management and Leadership, Maxwell School of Citzenship and Public Affairs. 

On four separate occasions, O’Keefe has served as a presidential appointee. Most recently, he was Administrator of NASA. Earlier, he was Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget at the White House. He also served as Secretary of the Navy, following service as Comptroller and CFO of the Defense Department.

Between public service appointments, O’Keefe has held faculty posts at LSU, Penn State University, and the Maxwell School, where he served as director of the National Security Studies Program and as Louis Bantle Chair of Business and Government.

O’Keefe is the former Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of Airbus Group Inc. Before joining Airbus, O’Keefe served as a Company Officer and Vice President of the General Electric Co. in the technology infrastructure sector and as Chancellor of Louisiana State University.

Faculty Webpage
Keli Perrin

KELI A. PERRIN

Biography

Keli Perrin is the Assistant Director of INSCT. In this role she administers the Security in the Middle East Program and coordinates several research and policy analysis projects, such as Victim Compensation, Resilience and Security, preSAGE, and Domesticating the Drone. Her research interests include homeland security, emergency management, and national security law.

In addition, Perrin is an adjunct professor in SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, where she teaches Homeland Security: Federal Policy and Implementation Challenges, an interdisciplinary course for graduate students pursuing degrees in international relations, public administration, political science, and law.

Perrin holds a J.D. from the SU College of Law.

Faculty Webpage

ROBERT A. RUBINSTEIN

Biography

Robert Rubinstein is a Professor of Anthropology and International Relations and former Director of the Program on the Analysis and Resolution of Conflicts at SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He has published more than 80 articles in journals and books and is author or editor of eight books, most recently Peacekeeping Under Fire: Culture and Intervention (Paradigm Publishers, 2008) and Building Peace: Practical Reflections from the Field (Kumarian, 2009).

Rubinstein is co-chair of the Commission on Peace and Human Rights of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences; interim president of the Central New York Peace Studies Consortium; and a member of the Board of Directors of the Ploughshares Fund. He has also served as an advisor to the United Nations Office of Internal Oversight Services’ evaluation of the UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti.

Rubinstein received a Ph.D. from SUNY-Binghamton and an M.S.P.H. from the University of Illinois School of Public Health.

Faculty Webpage
Nathan Sales

NATHAN SALES

On Aug. 3, 2017, Professor Sales was confirmed by the US Senate as Coordinator for Counterterrorism, with the rank and status of Ambassador at Large, US Department of State.
Biography

Nathan A. Sales is Associate Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law, where he teaches national security law, administrative law, and criminal law.

Sales’ scholarship has been cited by the US Supreme Court multiple times, and it has appeared in leading publications, including the Alabama Law Review, Duke Law Journal, George Washington Law Review, University of Illinois Law Review, Journal of National Security Law and Policy, Northwestern University Law Review, and Texas Law Review.  Also a frequent contributor to public debates, his commentary has been featured by The Atlantic, BBC, Christian Science Monitor, C-SPAN, Los Angeles Times, National Review Online, The New York Times, NPR, Politico, US News & World Report, Time, Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. He has testified before Congress on numerous occasions.

Before joining the SU Law faculty in 2014, Sales was an Assistant Professor at George Mason University School of Law, joining the faculty in 2008. Before his academic appointment he was the first Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy Development at the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), where his work focused on intelligence, information sharing, and terrorist travel. He led DHS’s efforts to draft and implement legislation that strengthened the security features of, and expanded, the Visa Waiver Program; he headed the US delegation in talks with seven countries to implement the new security measures; and he was the US Secretary of Homeland Security’s Special Envoy to South Korea.

From 2001 to 2003, Sales served at the Office of Legal Policy at the US Department of Justice (DOJ), where he focused on counterterrorism policy and the judicial confirmation process.  He received the Attorney General’s Award for Exceptional Service—the Justice Department’s highest honor—for his role in drafting the USA PATRIOT Act, as well as the Attorney General’s Distinguished Service Award for his work on judicial confirmations. In 2005, he returned to DOJ to run the “war room” for the confirmation of US Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts.

Sales graduated from Duke Law School magna cum laude, where he joined the Order of the Coif and was Research Editor of the Duke Law Journal. He has clerked for the Hon. David B. Sentelle of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit; practiced at the Washington, DC law firm Wiley Rein LLP; and was John M. Olin Fellow at the Georgetown University Law Center. An Ohio native, Sales is a member of the Virginia and District of Columbia bars.

Faculty Webpage

F. WILLIAM SMULLEN III

Biography

William Smullen is director of SU Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs’ National Security Studies Program, an integrated course of academic and practical instruction for senior US Department of Defense military and civilian officials. He also teaches public relations to both graduate and undergraduate students at SU’s SI Newhouse School of Public Communications.

Until August 2002, Smullen was Chief of Staff to US Secretary of State Colin Powell, with whom he worked for nearly 13 years. He was a professional soldier for 30 years, retiring from the US Army in 1993 as a colonel. He earned his B.A. in business and economics from the University of Maine and his M.A. in public relations from the Newhouse School.

Faculty Webpage

WILLIAM C. SNYDER

Biography

William C. Snyder is an Teaching Professor at SU College of Law, where he teaches Prosecuting Terrorists in Article III Courts, Federal Criminal Law, Computer Crimes, Evidence, and Counterterrorism and the Law.

A graduate of Yale University and the Cornell Law School, Snyder served more than 13 years as an Assistant US Attorney in the District of Columbia and in the Western District of Pennsylvania, including assignment to the Joint Terrorism Task Force. He was the 2004-2005 Fellow in Government Law and Policy at the Albany Law School, where he taught National Security Law and Fact Investigation.

Snyder’s research focuses on cybersecurity law and policy; the intersection of intelligence and law enforcement investigations; and determining principled reasons for choosing among civilian courts, international tribunals, and military courts to prosecute terrorists.

Faculty Webpage
Steinberg, James

JAMES B. STEINBERG

Biography

James B. Steinberg is former Dean of SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs and University Professor of Social Science, International Affairs, and Law.

Before this appointment, Steinberg was US Deputy Secretary of State, serving as the principal deputy to US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. From 2005 to 2008, Steinberg was Dean of the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and before that, he was Vice President and Director of Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he supervised a wide-ranging research program on US foreign policy. Steinberg served as Deputy National Security Advisor to President Bill Clinton from 1996 to 2000. During this appointment he served as the president’s personal representative to the 1998 and 1999 G8 Summits.

Faculty Webpage
 Laura_Steinberg

LAURA STEINBERG

Biography

Laura Steinberg is a Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering in the SU College of Engineering and Computer Science. The college’s former Dean, Steinberg’s expertise and research is in the areas of disaster management and resilience, environmental policy and modeling, critical infrastructure protection, and post-service veterans and STEM education.

Faculty Webpage
Brian Taylor

BRIAN TAYLOR

Biography

Brian Taylor is an Associate Professor of Political Science. His research focuses on the politics of Russia and the post-Soviet region. He also has studied the role of state coercive agencies, including the military and the police, in domestic politics.

Taylor is the author of Politics and the Russian Army: Civil-Military Relations, 1689-2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2003) and the monograph Russia’s Power Ministries: Coercion and Commerce (INSCT, 2007). He has published articles in multiple journals, including Comparative Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Europe-Asia Studies, Problems of Post-Communism, and International Studies Review.

Taylor received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Faculty Webpage

C. CORA TRUE-FROST

Biography

Cora True-Frost is an Associate Professor of Law whose scholarship draws from the areas of international relations theory, administrative law, and public international law. She teaches classes in International and Domestic Criminal Law, International Human Rights Law, and Regulatory Law and Policy.

True-Frost’s publications includeSignaling Credibility: The Development of Standing in International Security” (Cardozo Law Review, 2011) andThe Security Council and Norm Adoption” (NYU Journal of International Law & Policy, 2007). She has been a Climenko Fellow at Harvard Law School, and she earned an LL.M. from Harvard Law School and a J.D./M.P.A. magna cum laude as one of two fellows at the SU College of Law and Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

True-Frost has worked in East Timor and Sierra Leone and led the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace, and Security at the United Nations headquarters. She was also a litigation associate at Cravath, Swaine, and Moore LLP. Before returning to law school, True-Frost taught middle school in Baltimore and Harlem with Teach for America.

Faculty Webpage
David Van Slyke

DAVID VAN SLYKE

Biography

David Van Slyke

David M. Van Slyke is Dean of the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University and Louis A. Bantle Chair in Business and Government Policy at SU’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, an Associate Professor of Public Administration, and a Senior Research Associate in the Campbell Institute of Public Affairs. His research areas focus on public and nonprofit management topics, including privatization and public-private partnerships, contracting and contract management, policy implementation, strategic management, and philanthropy.

Van Slyke has published on public and nonprofit management topics in journals such as the Public Administration Review, Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, and International Journal of Public Administration. He is the recipient of the 2002 Best Article Award and the 1999 Best Conference Paper Award from the Academy of Management’s Public-Nonprofit Division for a co-authored article that appeared in Organization Science.

Van Slyke received his Ph.D. in Public Administration and Policy from SUNY-Albany. At SU, he teaches Public Organizations and Management, Project Management, and Implementation of Social Policy.

Faculty Webpage
Corinne Zoli

CORRI ZOLI

Biography

Corri Zoli is Director of Research and a Research Assistant Professor at INSCT. She holds a Ph.D. in Cultural Studies, and her work adapts a concern for cultural interests (such ethnicity, religion, ideology, norms, rhetoric, heritage, and identity) in world affairs to traditional security topics, such as grand strategy, patterns of global conflict, and transnational security.

Zoli’s current research focuses on global security issues at the intersection of cultural studies and security policy, with interest in gender and identity, terrorism, critical theory, and globalization.

Faculty Website